THE PROCES

If your dream is attending a college in the USA, we are here to make your dream come true.
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APPLY NOW
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ASSESSMENT
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PREPARATION
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PROMOTION
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FINAL STAGE
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FLYING OUT

Doing Your Homework

Contrary to what many young athletes think, it isn’t enough to be good at your sport if you want to land a sports scholarship in the USA. It is up to you to reach out to us and show us why you’d be a valuable asset to any high school or college team. To do this, you need to make a recruiting packet.

The recruiting packet contains:

  1. Highlights Video (sports scholarships only)
  2. Your CV
  3. Unofficial transcript of your grades
  4. Teacher recommendation letter/s
  5. Your goal and aspirations

We will promote You nation wide and help You out become familiar with U.S. visas:

International students who want to study at U.S. high schools typically need an F-1 visa if their goal is to stay for more than one year. Students coming for a one-year exchange program, sponsored by the Department of State, would need a J-1 visa. CSIET evaluates and approves organizations that bring students to U.S. high schools on these visas. Students on an F-1 visa can pursue a full secondary education – and even earn a diploma – at U.S. public and private high schools, but they can only study at public schools for one year. Regardless of the type of school they attend, international students on an F-1 visa must pay tuition or acquire a scholarship that will.

High School

Becoming a student/athlete in a us high school and becoming a part of that high schools culture is a process.

Step 1:

Creating a profile for a Student-Athlete

-Sports  evaluation

-Highlights video

– Academic evaluation

-current school report

– English teacher report

-Math teacher report

-High school transcripts

-TOEFL score (if needed)

– signing a contract with the student

Step 2:

Promoting a Student via our Network of Coaches, Principles, Program directors, Scouts, Teachers, etc..

Step 3:

Presenting offers to the Student and signing a school contract with him/her if any of the offers and conditions of the offer pleases the Student and Parents/Guardians.

Step 4:

Finishing all the Administration and Admissions process, getting insurance, paying government fees ( i20, i901, and SEVIS fee)

Step 5:

Getting a visa and flying out to the United States.

 

You will be assigned a designated Sports/Academic Consultant that you will work closely with throughout the process. Receive detailed guidelines on how to book in necessary tests for admission to American universities (SAT/ACT and/or TOEFL/IELTS) and anything else You will possibly need.

College and universities

A time of big change where you are forced to make some important, and often confronting, life decisions.

Step 1:

Creating a profile for a Student-Athlete

-Sports evaluation

-Highlights video

– Academic evaluation

-current school report

– English teacher report

-Math teacher report

-High school transcripts

-TOEFL score (if needed)

SAT/ACT score (if needed)

– College Credits ( if applies )

– signing a contract with the student

Step 2:

Promoting a Student via our Network of Coaches, Principles, Program directors, Scouts, Teachers, etc..

Step 3:

Presenting offers to the Student and signing a school contract with him/her if any of the offers and conditions of the offer pleases the Student and Parents/Guardians.

Step 4:

Finishing all the Administration and Admissions process, getting insurance, paying government fees ( i20, i901, and SEVIS fee)

Step 5:

Getting a visa and flying out to the United States.

 

You will be assigned a designated Sports/Academic Consultant that you will work closely with throughout the process. Receive detailed guidelines on how to book in necessary tests for admission to American universities (SAT/ACT and/or TOEFL/IELTS) and anything else You will possibly need.

Once you’ve taken some time to consider the standard of sport you’d like to play and what kind of college you’d like to enroll at (leaning towards academics or sports), you should start considering how you can get there.
The number one way to gain admission is to secure a sports scholarship.

However, this process can be a tad tricky.

Once again, there are many differences between the divisions and the types of scholarships on offer, so make sure you know your stuff.

Division I and II

Combined, NCAA Division I and II colleges provide more than $2.9 billion in athletics scholarships annually to more than 150,000 student-athletes.

For men:

  • In Division I, the average scholarship amount is $14,270.
  • In Division II, the average is $5,548.

For women:

  • In Division I, the average scholarship amount is $15,162.
  • In Division II, the average is $6,814.

As a disclaimer:

  • major sports, such as Basketball and Football, tend to get higher scholarship amounts.

Division III

For men and women:

  • NCAA Division III colleges do not offer sporting scholarships.

Okay, so this may sounds crazy, but your best option might be at a Division III school.
This will depend on how much balance you want as a student-athlete. Are you more student, or more athlete?
If your focus is as much getting a quality education as it is quality sports coaching, you can choose one of the better schools that populate Division III. This means you’ll be under less pressure athletically, but you’ll pay a bit more in tuition.
Having said that, there are some ways around the system.
In some cases, student-athletes at Division III colleges can receive substantial need-based aid.
Or, you might even be able to go for an academic merit scholarships at one of these schools.


So, depending on your goals and priorities, your best option might not be a full-ride scholarship at a Division I school, but rather an academic scholarship at a Division III school.

Figure out your ideal academics-sport ratio, and go from there.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know some of the ins and outs of sports scholarships, start preparing!
Coaches can be looking at candidates as young as 13, so if you’re already well into your teens, you need to get serious.
Talk to coaches, talk to students, reach out to athletes, and discuss the options with your parents.
It’s not easy, but if it’s something you know is worth doing, make sure you’re giving it all you’ve got.

Likelihood of competing beyond high school at more popular sports:

Varsity sport Competed at High School Competing at College % competing in College
Basketball 433,344 27,710 6.40%
Bowling 25,751 1,173 4.60%
Cross Country 218,121 19,351 8.90%
Field Hockey 61,471 5,885 9.60%
Golf 72,172 6,638 9.20%
Gymnastics 19,231 1,733 9.00%
Lacrosse 81,969 10,869 13.30%
Soccer 374,564 37,760 10.10%
Softball 371,891 30,874 8.30%
Swimming & Diving 165,779 13,679 8.30%
Tennis 215,737 10,869 5.00%
Track & Field 545,011 33,197 6.10%
Volleyball 429,634 26,570 6.20%
Varsity sport Competed at High School Competing at College % competing in College
Archery 2,705 54 2.00%
Baseball 482,629 55,410 11.50%
Basketball 541,479 32,735 6.10%
Bowling 28,121 769 2.70%
Cross Country 252,547 18,217 7.20%
Football 1,122,024 90,136 8.00%
Golf 152,647 12,292 8.10%
Ice Hockey 35,393 4,360 12.30%
Lacrosse 106,720 13,857 13.00%
Soccer 417,419 37,890 9.10%
Swimming & Diving 138,373 10,893 7.90%
Tennis 191,004 10,060 5.30%
Track & Field 653,971 33,955 5.20%
Volleyball 52,149 2,314 4.40%
Water Polo 21,451 1,670 7.80%
Wrestling 269,514 9,756 3.60%